Cemeteries

Cemetery Information

Table of Cemeteries

1, Arras Memorial

 11: Vis-En-Artois Memorial

 21: Caudrey British Cemetery

31: Portsmouth (Eastney or Highland Road) Cemetery.

2: Wimereux Communal Cemetery

12: Sunken Road Cemetery

22: Loos Memorial

 32: Leicester (Welford Road) Cemetery

3: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

 13: St Patrick's Cemetery

23: Adelaide Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux.

 33: Jerusalem Memorial

4: Tyne Cot

 14. New Irish Farm Cemetery

24: Lapugnoy Military Cemetery.

 34: Menin Gate

5: Zuydcoote Military Cemetery

 15. Voormezeele Enclosure No 3

25: Ovillers Military Cemetery.

 35: Coxyde Military Cemetery

6: Portsmouth Naval Memorial

 16: Helles Memorial Turkey.

26: Basra Memorial.

 36: Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt

 7: Longueval Road Cemetery

 17: The Huts Cemetery

27: St.Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen.

 37: Ploegsteert Memorial

 8: Ledeghem Military Cemetery

18: Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery

28: Queant Communal Cemetery.

 38: Bucquoy Communal Cemetery Extension   

 9: Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery

19: Peronne Road Cemetery

29: Amara War Cemetery.

 39: Sailly-Labourse Communal Cemetery

 10: Pozieres Memorial

 20: Thiepval Memorial

30: Sanctuary Wood Cemetery.

 40: St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen

 

1: Arras Memorial

Cemetery: ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

The Arras Memorial is in the Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery, which is in the Boulevard du General de Gaulle in the western part of the town of Arras. The cemetery is near the Citadel, approximately 2 kilometres due west of the railway station.

Historical Information:

The French handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917. The Commonwealth section of the FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY was begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier. It continued to be used by field ambulances and fighting units until November 1918. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from two smaller cemeteries in the vicinity. The cemetery contains 2,651 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. In addition, there are 30 war graves of other nationalities, most of them German. The graves in the French military cemetery were removed after the war to other burial grounds and the land they had occupied was used for the construction of the Arras Memorial and Arras Flying Services Memorial. The ARRAS MEMORIAL commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The most conspicuous events of this period were the Arras offensive of April-May 1917, and the German attack in the spring of 1918. Canadian and Australian servicemen killed in these operations are commemorated by memorials at Vimy and Villers-Bertonneux. A separate memorial remembers those killed in the Battle of Cambrai in 1917. The ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL commemorates more than 1,000 airmen of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who were killed on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave. During the Second World War, Arras was occupied by United Kingdom forces headquarters until the town was evacuated on 23 May 1940. Arras then remained in German hands until retaken by Commonwealth and Free French forces on 1 September 1944. The cemetery contains seven Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. Both cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, with sculpture by Sir William Reid Dick.

 

2: Wimereux Communal Cemetery

Cemetery: WIMEREUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

Wimereux is a small town situated about 5 kilometres north of Boulogne. From Boulogne take the A16 to Calais and come off at Junction 4. Take the road to Wimereux north, D242, for approximately 2 kilometres, following the road through the roundabout. Take the first turn on the left immediately after the roundabout and the Cemetery lies approximately 200 metres down this road on the left hand side. The Commonwealth War Graves are situated to the rear of the Communal Cemetery.

Historical Information:

Wimereux was the headquarters of the Queen Mary's Army Auxilliary Corps during the First World War and in 1919 it became the General Headquarters of the British Army. From October 1914 onwards, Boulogne and Wimereux formed an important hospital centre and until June 1918, the medical units at Wimereux used the communal cemetery for burials, the south-eastern half having been set aside for Commonwealth graves, although a few burial were also made among the civilian graves. By June 1918, this half of the cemetery was filled, and subsequent burials from the hospitals at Wimereux were made in the new military cemetery at Terlincthun. During the Second World War, British Rear Headquarters moved from Boulogne to Wimereux for a few days in May 1940, prior to the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk. Thereafter, Wimereux was in German hands and the German Naval Headquarters were situated on the northern side of the town. After D-Day, as Allied forces moved northwards, the town was shelled from Cap Griz-Nez, and was re-taken by the Canadian 1st Army on 22 September 1944. Wimereux Communal Cemetery contains 2,845 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. Buried among them is Lt.-Col. John McCrae, author of the poem "In Flanders Fields." There are also five French and a plot of 170 German war graves. The cemetery also contains 14 Second World War burials, six of them unidentified. The Commonwealth section was designed by Charles Holden. Because of the sandy nature of the soil, the headstones lie flat upon the graves.

 

3: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

Cemetery: LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Location:

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery is located 12 kilometres west of Ieper town centre, on the Boescheepseweg, a road leading from the N308 connecting Ieper to Poperinge. From Ieper town centre the Poperingseweg (N308) is reached via Elverdingsestraat, then over two small roundabouts in the J. Capronstraat. The Poperingseweg is a continuation of the J. Capronstraat and begins after a prominent railway level crossing. On reaching Poperinge, the N308 joins the left hand turning onto the R33, Poperinge ring road. The R33 ring continues to the left hand junction with the N38 Frans- Vlaanderenweg. 800 metres along the N38 lies the left hand turning onto Lenestraat. The next immediate right hand turning leads onto Boescheepseweg. The cemetery itself is located 2 kilometres along Boescheepseweg on the right hand side of the road.

Historical Information:

During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations. The cemetery was first used by the French 15th Hopital D'Evacuation and in June 1915, it began to be used by casualty clearing stations of the Commonwealth forces. From April to August 1918, the casualty clearing stations fell back before the German advance and field ambulances (including a French ambulance) took their places. The cemetery contains 9,901 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, a few of which were brought in from the battlefields after the Armistice, and 883 war graves of other nationalities, mostly French and German. It is the second largest Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

 

4: Tyne Cot

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Location:

The Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing forms the north-eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery, which is located 9 kilometres north east of Ieper town centre, on the Tynecotstraat, a road leading from the Zonnebeekseweg (N332). The names of those from United Kingdom units are inscribed on Panels arranged by Regiment under their respective Ranks. The names of those from New Zealand units are inscribed on panels within the New Zealand Memorial Apse located at the center of the Memorial.

Historical Information:

The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations except New Zealand who died in the Salient before 16 August 1917. Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The TYNE COT MEMORIAL now bears the names of almost 35,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Herbert Baker with sculpture by Joseph Armitage and F V Blundstone, was unveiled by Sir Gilbert Dyett in July 1927. The memorial forms the north-eastern boundary of TYNE COT CEMETERY, which was established around a captured German blockhouse or pill-box used as an advanced dressing station. The original battlefield cemetery of 343 graves was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when remains were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck, and from a few small burial grounds. It is now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world in terms of burials. At the suggestion of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, the Cross of Sacrifice was placed on the original large pill-box. There are three other pill-boxes in the cemetery. There are now 11,952 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery. 8,365 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to more than 80 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 20 casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

 

5:      Zuydcoote Military Cemetery

Cemetery: ZUYDCOOTE MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France

Location:

Zuydcoote is a village in the Department of the Nord about 10 kilometres north-east of Dunkirk. The Military Cemetery is west of the village and about 550 metres east of Zuydcoote Halte.

Historical Information:

In the autumn of 1917, while the XV Corps was holding the Nieuport section, the 34th and 36th Casualty Clearing Stations were posted at Zuydcoote; and the Military Cemetery contains; for the most part, the graves of officers and men who died in these hospitals. There are now over 300, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. The cemetery covers an area of 1,042 square metres and is enclosed by a wall. On the West side of it is ZUYDCOOTE FRENCH NATIONAL CEMETERY, made after the Armistice, and containing over 1,000 French and 170 German graves. Two of the British graves were brought after the Armistice from ZUYDCOOTE CHURCHYARD FRENCH MILITARY EXTENSION.

 

6: Portsmouth Naval Memorial

Cemetery: PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire, United Kingdom

Location:

The Memorial is situated on Southsea Common overlooking the promenade, and is accessible at all times.

Historical Information:

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole. After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each. The architect for the Second World War extension at Portsmouth was Sir Edward Maufe (who also designed the Air Forces memorial at Runnymede) and the additional sculpture was by Charles Wheeler, William McMillan, and Esmond Burton. Portsmouth Naval Memorial commemorates almost 10,000 sailors of the First World War and almost 15,000 from the Second World War

 

7: Longueval Road Cemetery

Cemetery: LONGUEVAL ROAD CEMETERY, Somme, France

Location:

Longueval is a village in the Department of the Somme, 11 kilometres east of Albert. Travel north-east from Albert on the D929 in the direction of Bapaume. After 10 kilometres take the D6 in the direction of Martinpuich and follow signs for Longueval. From Longueval crossroads continue in the direction of Maricourt, D197, for 800 metres. Longueval Road Cemetery is situated on the left hand side of the road.

Historical Information:

Longueval was the scene of furious fighting in 1916, lasting from the 14th to the 29th July, when the village was cleared by the 5th Division. It was lost in March 1918, and retaken by the 38th (Welsh) Division and the Carabineers on the 28th August, 1918. Longueval Road Cemetery was begun in September 1915, near a Dressing Station known as "Longueval Alley", or "Longueval Water Point", and it was used until January 1917. Further burials were made in August and September 1918. The graves numbered 171 at the date of the Armistice; and others were added in 1923-24 by concentrations from a wide area round Longueval. There are now over 200, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over one-fifth are unidentified and special memorials are erected to 3 soldiers from the United Kingdom, known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery covers an area of 1,015 square metres and is bounded by a low red brick wall.

 

8: Ledeghem Military Cemetery

Cemetery: LEDEGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, Ledegem, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Location:

Ledeghem Military Cemetery is located 17 Km east of Ieper town centre on a road leading from the N8 Meenseweg connecting Ieper to Menen. The N8 leads from Ieper to Menen via Geluveld and Geluwe. On reaching the town of Menen the left hand turning onto the N32 Bruggestraat leads to Roeselare. 4.5 Km along the N32 lies the right hand turning onto Papestraat which leads to Ledegem. On reaching the village of Ledegem the first right hand turning along the Sint Eloois-Winkelstraat leads onto the Hugo Verriestlaan. The cemetery is accessed by a short path off the Hugo Verriestlaan.

 

Historical Information:

Ledeghem was almost captured on the 19th October 1914, by the 10th Hussars, who were forced to retire the same day; and it remained in German hands for four years. On the 1st October 1918 the 9th (Scottish) Division captured the village, but could not hold the whole of it; on the 14th, it was cleared by the 29th Division. The church, the school and the civil hospital of Ledeghem were used by the Germans as hospitals, and in October 1914 to September 1918, they buried German and British soldiers and airmen in three cemeteries in the commune. Ledeghem Military Cemetery was made by the 29th Division (as "Ledeghem New Cemetery") in October 1918. The graves of 14 soldiers from the United Kingdom, who fell in October 1914 and September and October 1918, were removed to this cemetery in October 1951 from Ledeghem Churchyard. There are now over 80, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over 10 are unidentified and special memorials are erected to two soldiers believed to be buried here as unknown and one whose grave was destroyed by shell fire in Ledeghem Churchyard. The Military Cemetery covers an area of 217 square metres and is enclosed by a low red brick wall.

 

9: Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery

Cemetery: BAGHDAD (NORTH GATE) WAR CEMETERY, Iraq

Location: Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery is 800 metres beyond the North Gate of the City of Baghdad on the south-eastern side of the road to Baguba.

Historical Information:

In 1914, Baghdad was the headquarters of the Turkish Army in Mesopotamia. It was the ultimate objective of the Indian Expeditionary Force 'D' and the goal of the force besieged and captured at Kut in 1916. The city finally fell in March 1917, but the position was not fully consolidated until the end of April. Nevertheless, it had by that time become the Expeditionary Force's advanced base, with two stationary hospitals and three casualty clearing stations. The North Gate Cemetery was begun In April 1917 and has been greatly enlarged since the end of the First World War by graves brought in from other burial grounds in Baghdad and northern Iraq, and from battlefields and cemeteries in Anatolia where Commonwealth prisoners of war were buried by the Turks. At present, 4,142 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War are commemorated by name in the cemetery, many of them on special memorials. Unidentified burials from this period number 2,729. The cemetery also contains the grave of Lieutenant General Sir Stanley Maude, Commander-in-Chief of the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force, who died at Baghdad in November 1917 and the memorial to the 13th Division which he commanded. A memorial to the 6th Battalion Loyal (North Lancashire) Regiment was brought into the cemetery from the banks of the Diyala River in 1947. During the Second World War, Baghdad was again an objective of Commonwealth forces. The 20th Indian Infantry Brigade reached the city from Shaiba by the Euphrates route on 12 June 1941 and the 21st Indian Infantry Brigade, part of the 13th Duke of Connaught's Own Lancers, together with the 157th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, arrived on 19 June via the Tigris. An advanced base was established later near the city and remained in use until 1946. Most of the 296 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried in the cemetery died of illness or by accident when serving with PAIFORCE. Again, a number of the graves were brought in from other burial grounds. Within the cemetery is the Baghdad (North Gate) (Khanaqin) Memorial, commemorating 104 Commonwealth and 439 Polish servicemen of the Second World War buried in Khanaqin War Cemetery which, owing to difficulty of access, could not be properly maintained. A memorial has also been erected at Khanaqin. The North Gate Cemetery also contains 127 war graves of other nationalities from both wars, 100 of them Turkish, and 41 non-war graves.

 

10: Pozieres Memorial

Cemetery: POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France

Location:

Pozieres is a village 6 kilometres north-east of the town of Albert. The Memorial encloses Pozieres British Cemetery which is a little south-west of the village on the north side of the main road, D929, from Albert to Pozieres. On the road frontage is an open arcade terminated by small buildings and broken in the middle by the entrance and gates. Along the sides and the back, stone tablets are fixed in the stone rubble walls bearing the names of the dead grouped under their Regiments. It should be added that, although the memorial stands in a cemetery of largely Australian graves, it does not bear any Australian names. The Australian soldiers who fell in France and whose graves are not known are commemorated on the National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux.
Historical Information:

The POZIERES MEMORIAL relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918. The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918. The Corps and Regiments most largely represented are The Rifle Brigade with over 600 names, The Durham Light Infantry with approximately 600 names, the Machine Gun Corps with over 500, The Manchester Regiment with approximately 500 and The Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery with over 400 names. The memorial encloses POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY, Plot II of which contains original burials of 1916, 1917 and 1918, carried out by fighting units and field ambulances. The remaining plots were made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediately surrounding the cemetery, the majority of them of soldiers who died in the Autumn of 1916 during the latter stages of the Battle of the Somme, but a few represent the fighting in August 1918. There are now 2,755 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,375 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 23 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery and memorial were designed by W H Cowlishaw.

 

11: Vis-En-Artois Memorial

Cemetery: VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

Vis-en-Artois and Haucourt are villages on the straight main road from Arras to Cambrai about 10 kilometres south-east of Arras. Within the grounds of Vis-en-Artois British Cemetery, which is west of Haucourt on the north side of the main road, will be found the Vis-en-Artois Memorial. This Memorial bears the names of over 9,000 men who fell in the period from 8 August 1918 to the date of the Armistice in the Advance to Victory in Picardy and Artois, between the Somme and Loos, and who have no known grave. They belonged to the forces of Great Britain and Ireland and South Africa; the Canadian, Australian and New Zealand forces being commemorated on other memorials to the missing. The Memorial consists of a screen wall in three parts. The middle part of the screen wall is concave and carries stone panels on which names are carved. It is 26 feet high flanked by pylons 70 feet high. The Stone of Remembrance stands exactly between the pylons and behind it, in the middle of the screen, is a group in relief representing St George and the Dragon. The flanking parts of the screen wall are also curved and carry stone panels carved with names. Each of them forms the back of a roofed colonnade; and at the far end of each is a small building.
Historical Information:

 

12: Sunken Road Cemetery

Cemetery: SUNKEN ROAD CEMETERY, BOISLEUX-ST. MARC, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

Boisleux-St Marc is a village in the department of the Pas-de-Calais, 8 kilometres south of Arras. Sunken Road Cemetery is down a 1 kilometre track on the west side of the road running between this village and the adjacent village of Boisleux-au-Mont (D42E).

Historical Information:

Boisleux-St. Marc village was occupied by British troops in March, 1917, in the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line. The 20th Casualty Clearing Station was established at Boisleux-au-Mont in June, and the 43rd in November; but by the end of March, 1918, both had left, and from April to almost the end of August part of Boisleux-St. Marc was in enemy hands. In September, October and November, six Casualty Clearing Stations were posted, for shorts periods, at Boisleux-au-Mont. Sunken Road Cemetery was called at one time "Boisleux-au-Mont British Cemetery". It was begun by the hospitals in May, 1917, and used until July, when it began to be shelled; four burials were made in March, 1918; and it was completed in September and October, 1918. There are now over 400, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. The Cemetery covers an area of 1,128 square metres and is enclosed by a brick wall on three sides.

 

13: St Patrick's Cemetery

Cemetery: ST. PATRICK'S CEMETERY, LOOS, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

The village of Loos-en-Gohelle is just north of Lens on the N43, Lens to Bethune road. Turn right off the N43 onto the D165, signposted for Wingles and La Bassee, and continue along this road for 0.5 kilometres. Turn left at the village square and left again. Continue along this road and the cemetery is on the right after approximately 200 metres.
Historical Information:

St. Patrick's Cemetery was begun during the battle by French and British troops, and used in 1916 very largely by the units of the 16th (Irish) Division. It was closed in June, 1918, but a small number of graves were brought into it after the Armistice from the battlefields between Loos and Hulluch. The irregular arrangement of the rows is due to the conditions under which the burials were carried out. There are now nearly 600, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this cemetery. Of these, over 40 are unidentified and the graves of 23, destroyed by shell fire, are now represented by special memorials. The cemetery covers an area of 3,001 square metres and is enclosed by a brick wall.

14. New Irish Farm Cemetery

Cemetery: NEW IRISH FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Location:

The cemetery is located to the north-east of the town of Ieper. From the station turn left and follow along M Fochlaan to the roundabout. Turn right and at the next roundabout turn left into M Haiglaan. Follow along this road to the traffic lights and at the lights turn right in the direction of Kortrijk (A19). Follow along the expressway to the next set of lights. At these lights turn left into Pilkemseweg, then take the first right into Zwaanhofweg, a small country road. Follow this road to the crossroads and the cemetery is on your right.

Historical Information:

New Irish Farm Cemetery was first used from August to November 1917, and again in April and May 1918. At the Armistice it contained just 73 burials - the three irregular rows of Plot I - but was then greatly enlarged when more than 4,500 graves were brought in from the battlefields north-east of Ypres (now Ieper) and from numerous smaller cemeteries in the area. There are now 4,715 commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 3,267 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate four casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of 30 casualties buried in four of the cemeteries concentrated into New Irish Farm whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

15. Voormezeele Enclosure No 3

Cemetery: VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURE No.3, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Location:

Voormezeele Enclosure No. 3 is located 4 kilometres south-west of Ieper town centre on the Ruusschaartstraat, a road leading from the Kemmelseweg (Connecting Ieper to Kemmel N331). From Ieper town centre the Kemmelseweg is reached via the Rijselsestraat, through the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) and straight on towards Armentieres (N365). 900 metres after the crossroads is the right hand turning onto the Kemmelseweg (made prominent by a railway level crossing). Turn right onto the Kemmelseweg and follow this road to the first crossroads, turn left here into Ruusschaartstraat. The Cemetery is located 1 kilometre after this junction on the left hand side of the road just before Voormezeele Dorp.


Historical Information:

The Voormizeele Enclosures (at one time four in number, but now reduced to three) were originally regimental groups of graves, begun very early in the First World War and gradually increased until the village and the cemeteries were captured by the Germans after very heavy fighting on 29 April 1918. Voormezeele Enclosure No 3, the largest of these burial grounds, was begun by the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in February 1915. Their graves are in Plot III, the other Plots from I to IX are the work of other units, or pairs of units, and include a few graves of October 1918. Plots X and XII are of a more general character. Plots XIII to XVI were made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from isolated sites and smaller cemeteries. These concentrated graves cover the months from January 1915 to October 1918, and they include those of many men of the 15th Hampshires and other units who recaptured this ground early in September 1918. There are now 1,611 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Voormezeele Enclosure No 3. 609 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 15 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of five casualties whose graves in another cemetery could not be found on concentration. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

 

16: Helles Memorial, Turkey

Location:

The Helles Memorial stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. It takes the form of an obelisk over 30 metres high that can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles.
The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.
Picture link

Historical Information:

The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. However, the difficult terrain and stiff Turkish resistance soon led to the stalemate of trench warfare. From the end of August, no further serious action was fought and the lines remained unchanged. The peninsula was successfully evacuated in December and early January 1916. The Helles Memorial serves the dual function of Commonwealth battle memorial for the whole Gallipoli campaign and place of commemoration for many of those Commonwealth servicemen who died there and have no known grave. The United Kingdom and Indian forces named on the memorial died in operations throughout the peninsula, the Australians at Helles. There are also panels for those who died or were buried at sea in Gallipoli waters. The memorial bears more than 21,000 names. There are four other Memorials to the Missing at Gallipoli. The Lone Pine, Hill 60, and Chunuk Bair Memorials commemorate Australian and New Zealanders at Anzac. The Twelve Tree Copse Memorial commemorates the New Zealanders at Helles. Naval casualties of the United Kingdom lost or buried at sea are recorded on their respective Memorials at Portsmouth, Plymouth and Chatham, in the United Kingdom.

17: THE HUTS CEMETERY

Cemetery: THE HUTS CEMETERY Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Location:

The Huts Cemetery is located 6 kilometres south west of Ieper town centre. From Ieper town centre the Dikkebusseweg (N375) is reached via Elverdingsestraat, straight over a roundabout onto J. Capronstraat (for 30 metres), then left along M. Fochlaan. Immediately after the train station the first right hand turning is the Dikkebusseweg. On reaching Dikkebus village the cemetery is reached by taking a right hand turning onto the Melkerijstraat. This road continues for 1 kilometre, over a crossroads and bending sharply to the right, then meeting a junction with the Steenakkerstraat. The cemetery is located 200 metres after this junction on the Steenakkerstraat.

Historical Information:

This cemetery takes its name from a line of huts strung along the road from Dickebusch (now Dikkebus) to Brandhoek, which were used by field ambulances during the 1917 Allied offensive on this front. Much of the cemetery was filled between July and November 1917 and nearly two thirds of the burials were of gunners from nearby artillery positions The cemetery was closed in April 1918 when the German advance brought the front line very close. The advance was finally halted on the eastern side of the village, following fierce fighting at Dickebusch Lake, on 8 May. There are now 1,094 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

18: CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY

Cemetery: CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, Souchez, Pas de Calais, France

Location:

Souchez is a village 3.5 kilometres north of Arras on the main road to Bethune. The cemetery is about 1.5 kilometres south of the village on the west side of the D937 Arras-Bethune Road.

Historical Information:

Souchez was sacked more than once in the Middle Ages, and raided by the Germans in December, 1870. It was captured by the French on the 26th September, 1915, and the area was taken over by British troops in the following March. The village was completely destroyed. The "Cabaret Rouge" was a house on the main road about 1 kilometre south of the village, at a place called Le Corroy, near the British cemetery. On the East side, opposite the cemetery, were dugouts used as Battalion Headquarters in 1916. The communication trenches ended here, including a very long one named from the Cabaret. The cemetery was begun by British troops in March, 1916, and used until August, 1917 (largely by the 47th (London) Division and the Canadian Corps) and - at intervals - until September, 1918. (These original burials are in Plots I to V inclusive). It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice by the concentration of over 7,000 graves, partly from the battlefields of Arras, and partly from 103 other burial grounds in the Nord and the Pas-de-Calais. There are now nearly 8,000, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site and 1 from the 1939-45 War. The cemetery covers an area of 24,772 square metres and is enclosed by a low rubble wall. On 25th May 2000 the remains of an unidentified Canadian soldier were entrusted to Canada at a ceremony held at the Vimy Memorial, France. The remains had been exhumed by France Area staff of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission from Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Plot 8, Row E, Grave 7. The remains were laid to rest within the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, in a sarcophagus placed at the foot of the National War Memorial, Confederation Square, Ottawa, Canada.

 

19, PERONNE ROAD CEMETERY

Cemetery: PERONNE ROAD CEMETERY, MARICOURT Somme, France

Location:

Maricourt is a village situated on the D938, Albert-Peronne Road, 10.5 kilometres from Albert. The Cemetery is on the western outskirts of the village.

Historical Information:

Maricourt was, at the beginning of the Battles of the Somme, 1916, the point of junction of the British and French forces, and within a very short distance of the front line; it was lost in the German advance of March, 1918, and recaptured at the end of the following August. The Cemetery was begun by fighting units and Field Ambulances in the Battles of the Somme, 1916, and used until August, 1917; a few graves were added later in the War, and at the Armistice it consisted of 175 graves which now form almost the whole of Plot I. It was completed after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields in the immediate neighbourhood and from certain smaller burial grounds. There are now 1348, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, 366 are unidentified and special memorials are erected to 26 soldiers from the United Kingdom known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of three soldiers from the United Kingdom, buried in other cemeteries, whose graves could not be found. The cemetery covers an area of 3,787 square metres and is enclosed on three sides by a low red brick wall. The following were among the burial grounds from which British graves were removed to Peronne Road Cemetery:- AUTHUILE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, which was on the South side of the Communal Cemetery. It contained the graves of 108 French soldiers and those of 23 from the United Kingdom who fell in 1915 and early 1916. BRIQUETERIE EAST CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN, on the East side of the brick-works between Maricourt and Montauban, containing the graves of 46 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in the latter half of 1916. CARNOY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, in which 36 French soldiers and one from the United Kingdom were buried in March, 1918. CASEMENT TRENCH CEMETERY, MARICOURT, on the West side of the road to the Briqueterie, in which 163 soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from South Africa were buried in 1916-1918. FARGNY MILL FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, CURLU, on the North bank of the Somme, in which six soldiers from the United Kingdom and two from Australia were buried in 1916-1918. LA COTE MILITARY CEMETERY, MARICOURT, a little way West of Peronne Road Cemetery, containing the graves of 38 soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from Australia who fell in 1916-1917. MARICOURT FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, on the South side of the village, containing the graves of two soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in December, 1916. MONTAUBAN ROAD FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, MARICOURT, in which six men of the 1st/8th King's Liverpools were buried in August, 1916. TALUS BOISE BRITISH CEMETERY, CARNOY, between Carnoy and Maricourt, at the South end of a long copse. It was used in the latter half of 1916 and (chiefly by the 5th Royal Berks) in August, 1918, and it contained the graves of 175 soldiers from the United Kingdom and five from South Africa.

20, Thiepval Memorial

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Country: France

Locality:

Somme The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.

Location Information:

The Thiepval Memorial will be found on the D73, off the main Bapaume to Albert road (D929). Each year a major ceremony is held at the memorial on 1 July. Historical Information: On 1 July 1916, supported by a French attack to the south, thirteen divisions of Commonwealth forces launched an offensive on a line from north of Gommecourt to Maricourt. Despite a preliminary bombardment lasting seven days, the German defences were barely touched and the attack met unexpectedly fierce resistance. Losses were catastrophic and with only minimal advances on the southern flank, the initial attack was a failure. In the following weeks, huge resources of manpower and equipment were deployed in an attempt to exploit the modest successes of the first day. However, the German Army resisted tenaciously and repeated attacks and counter attacks meant a major battle for every village, copse and farmhouse gained. At the end of September, Thiepval was finally captured. The village had been an original objective of 1 July. Attacks north and east continued throughout October and into November in increasingly difficult weather conditions. The Battle of the Somme finally ended on 18 November with the onset of winter. In the spring of 1917, the German forces fell back to their newly prepared defences, the Hindenburg Line, and there were no further significant engagements in the Somme sector until the Germans mounted their major offensive in March 1918. The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 31 July 1932. The dead of other Commonwealth countries who died on the Somme and have no known graves are commemorated on national memorials elsewhere. No. of Identified Casualties: 72100

 21, Caudrey British Cemetery

Cemetery: CAUDREY BRITISH CEMETERY

Country: France

Locality: Nord

Location Information:

Caudry is a town 10 kilometres east of Cambrai on the south side of the main road to Le Cateau. From the Cambrai-Le Cateau road (the N 43) take the dual carriageway into Caudry town. Follow this road for 1100 metres to a traffic light controlled junction. Turn left and follow this road for approximately 225 metres to a small road on the right (the first CWGC sign is at this junction). The cemetery lies on the left side of the road after travelling 100 metres.

Historical Information:

Caudry town was the scene of part of the Battle of Le Cateau on the 26th August 1914, and from that date it remained in German hands until the 10th October 1918, when it was captured by the 37th Division. It had been a German centre for medical units, and during October 1918 and the following five months the 21st, 3rd, 19th and 49th Casualty Clearing Stations passed through it. The British Cemetery (originally called the German Cemetery Extension) was begun in October 1918 by the New Zealand Division and carried on by the Casualty Clearing Stations. It was completed after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the German Cemetery and from Audencourt British Cemetery. At the same time the bodies of two French soldiers and one Italian were removed to other burial grounds. There are now over 700, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over 50 are unidentified and special memorials are erected to four soldiers and one airman from the United Kingdom known to be buried among them. Another special memorial records the name of a soldier from the United Kingdom, buried in Fontaine-au-Pire Communal Cemetery, whose grave could not be found. The cemetery covers an area of 2,770 square metres and is enclosed partly by a rubble wall. No. of Identified Casualties: 654

  

22: LOOS MEMORIAL

Cemetery: LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact the Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.

Location Information:

The Loos Memorial forms the side and back of Dud Corner Cemetery, and commemorates over 20,000 officers and men who have no known grave, who fell in the area from the River Lys to the old southern boundary of the First Army, east and west of Grenay. Loos-en-Gohelle is a village 5 kilometres north-west of Lens, and Dud Corner Cemetery is located about 1 kilometre west of the village, to the north-east of the N43 the main Lens to Bethune road. Historical Information: Dud Corner Cemetery stands almost on the site of a German strong point, the Lens Road Redoubt, captured by the 15th (Scottish) Division on the first day of the battle. The name "Dud Corner" is believed to be due to the large number of unexploded enemy shells found in the neighbourhood after the Armistice. On either side of the cemetery is a wall 15 feet high, to which are fixed tablets on which are carved the names of those commemorated. At the back are four small circular courts, open to the sky, in which the lines of tablets are continued, and between these courts are three semicircular walls or apses, two of which carry tablets, while on the centre apse is erected the Cross of Sacrifice.

No. of Identified Casualties: 20597

 

23: ADELAIDE CEMETERY

Cemetery: ADELAIDE CEMETERY, VILLERS-BRETONNEUX, Somme , France

Location Information:

Villers-Bretonneux is a town 16 kilometres east of Amiens and the Cemetery is situated west of the village on the north side of the main road from Amiens to St. Quentin. Historical Information: Villers-Bretonneux became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended in the capture of the village by their tanks and infantry on 23 April. On the following day, the 4th and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, recaptured the whole of the village and on 8 August 1918, the 2nd and 5th Australian Divisions advanced from its eastern outskirts in the Battle of Amiens. Adelaide Cemetery was begun early in June 1918 and used by the 2nd and 3rd Australian Divisions. It continued in use until the Allies began their advance in mid August, by which time it contained 90 graves (the greater part of the present Plot I, Rows A to E). After the Armistice a large number of graves were brought into the cemetery from small graveyards and isolated positions on the north, west and south of Villers-Bretonneux and they were, without exception, those of men who died in the months from March to September 1918. Plot I was filled, Plot II was made almost entirely with graves from United Kingdom units, and Plot III almost entirely with Australian. There are now 955 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 261 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to four casualties known, or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. On 2 November 1993, following a request by the government of Australia, an unknown Australian soldier killed in the First World War was exhumed from Plot III, Row M, Grave 13, and is now buried in the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

No. of Identified Casualties: 694

 

24: LAPUGNOY MILITARY CEMETERY

Cemetery: LAPUGNOY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France

Location Information:

Lapugnoy is a village 6 kilometres west of Bethune. From the centre of Lapugnoy, head south-west on the D70 in the direction of Marles-les-Mines. On the outskirts there is a crucifix at the side of the main road, turn right here towards Allouagne. After approximately 500 metres there is a track on the left hand side (the Cemetery is signposted here) and the Cemetery can be found on the left hand side, approximately 500 metres, along this track. Historical Information: The first burials were made in Plot I of the cemetery in September 1915, but it was most heavily used during the Battle of Arras, which began in April 1917. The dead were brought to the cemetery from casualty clearing stations, chiefly the 18th and the 23rd at Lapugnoy and Lozinghem, but between May and August 1918 the cemetery was used by fighting units. Lapugnoy Military Cemetery contains 1,323 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 11 from the Second World War, all dating from May 1940. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

No. of Identified Casualties: 1333

 

25: OVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY

Cemetery: OVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Somme, France

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to this site with some difficulty. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact the Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. Location Information: Ovillers is a village about 5 kilometres north-east of the town of Albert off the D929 road to Bapaume. The Military Cemetery is approximately 500 metres west of the village on the D20 road to Aveluy. The Cemetery is signposted in the village.

Historical Information:

On 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the 8th Division attacked Ovillers and the 34th Division La Boisselle. The villages were not captured, but ground was won between them and to the south of La Boisselle. On 4 July, the 19th (Western) Division cleared La Boisselle and on 7 July the 12th (Eastern) and 25th Divisions gained part of Ovillers, the village being cleared by the 48th (South Midland) Division on 17 July. The two villages were lost during the German advance in March 1918, but they were retaken on the following 24 August by the 38th (Welsh) Division. Ovillers Military Cemetery was begun before the capture of Ovillers, as a battle cemetery behind a dressing station. It was used until March 1917, by which time it contained 143 graves, about half the present Plot I. The cemetery was increased after the Armistice when Commonwealth and French graves where brought in, mainly from the battlefields of Pozieres, Ovillers, La Boisselle and Contalmaison. There are now 3,439 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 2,479 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 24 casualties believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of 35 casualties, buried in Mash Valley Cemetery, whose graves were destroyed in later fighting. The cemetery also contains 120 French war graves. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

No. of Identified Casualties: 1080

 

26: BASRA MEMORIAL

Cemetery: BASRA MEMORIAL Iraq

Visiting Information:

IT IS STRONGLY ADVISES THAT THE FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH OFFICE SHOULD BE CONTACTED BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO VISIT IRAQ. Their details are as follows: Travel Advice Unit Consular Division Foreign and Commonwealth Office Old Admiralty Building London SW1A 2AF Tel: 0207 008 0232/0233 Fax: 0207 008 0164 Website: http://www.fco.gov.uk/ Opening Times: Monday to Friday 09.30 - 16.00 Location Information: Until 1997 the Basra Memorial was located on the main quay of the naval dockyard at Maqil, on the west bank of the Shatt-al-Arab, about 8 kilometres north of Basra. Because of the sensitivity of the site, the Memorial was moved by presidential decree. The move, carried out by the authorities in Iraq, involved a considerable amount of manpower, transport costs and sheer engineering on their part, and the Memorial has been re-erected in its entirety. The Basra Memorial is now located 32 kilometres along the road to Nasiriyah, in the middle of what was a major battleground during the first Gulf War. The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.

Historical Information:

The Basra Memorial bears the names of more than 40,500 members of the Commonwealth forces who died in the operations in Mesopotamia from the Autumn of 1914 to the end of August 1921 and whose graves are not known.

No. of Identified Casualties: 40659

 

27: ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION

Cemetery: ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, Seine-Maritime, ROUEN, France

Visiting Information:

OPENING TIMES: 1 March - 1 November: Monday-Saturday : 0815-1815 Sundays/Public Holidays : 0815-1745 2 November-28 February: Every Day : 0815-1645

Location Information:

St Sever Cemetery and extension is a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs of Le Grand Quevilly and Le Petit Quevilly. If approaching Rouen from the north, head for the centre of town and cross over the river Seine, following signs for Caen. Follow this route until you get to the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), then take the first exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If approaching Rouen from the south, follow the N138 (Avenue des Canadiens) towards the centre of town. At the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), take the fourth exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If arriving on foot, take the metro to St Sever Metro Station, then follow the Avenue de Caen until you get to the Avenue de la Liberation, then take this road and follow this, which will become the Boulevard du 11 Novembre. At the end of this road is the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout. Take the first exit from this into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. Historical Information: During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. A base supply depot and the 3rd Echelon of General Headquarters were also established in the city. Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920. During the Second World War, Rouen was again a hospital centre and the extension was used once more for the burial of Commonwealth servicemen, many of whom died as prisoners of war during the German occupation. The cemetery extension contains 8,345 Commonwealth burials of the First World War (ten of them unidentified) and 328 from the Second World War (18 of them unidentified). The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

No. of Identified Casualties: 8654

 

28: QUEANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION

Cemetery: QUEANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France

Visiting Information:

The location or design of this site makes wheelchair access impossible. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact the Enquiries Section on 01628 507200.

Location Information:

Queant is a village 25 kilometres south-east of Arras. The Cemetery is on the western outskirts of the village on the road to Riencourt-les-Cagnicourt. Historical Information: Queant was close behind the Hindenburg Line, at the South end of a minor defence system known as the Drocourt-Queant Line, and it was not captured by British troops until the 2nd September, 1918. On the North side of the Communal Cemetery was a German Extension of nearly 600 graves (1916-1918), now removed; and the British Extension was made by fighting units, on the far side of the German Extension, in September and October, 1918. There are now nearly 300, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified. The cemetery covers an area of 1,011 square metres and is enclosed by a flint and rubble wall.

No. of Identified Casualties: 270

 

29: AMARA WAR CEMETERY

Cemetery: AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq

Visiting Information:

IT IS STRONGLY ADVISES THAT THE FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH OFFICE SHOULD BE CONTACTED BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO VISIT IRAQ. Their details are as follows: Travel Advice Unit Consular Division Foreign and Commonwealth Office Old Admiralty Building London SW1A 2AF Tel: 0207 008 0232/0233 Fax: 0207 008 0164 Website: http://www.fco.gov.uk/ Opening Times: Monday to Friday 09.30 - 16.00 Location Information: Amara is a town on the left bank of the Tigris some 520 kilometres from the sea. The War Cemetery is a little east of the town between the left bank of the river and the Chahaila Canal.

Historical Information:

Amara was occupied by the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force on 3 June 1915 and it immediately became a hospital centre. The accommodation for medical units on both banks of the Tigris was greatly increased during 1916 and in April 1917, seven general hospitals and some smaller units were stationed there. Amara War Cemetery contains 4,621 burials of the First World War, more than 3,000 of which were brought into the cemetery after the Armistice. 925 of the graves are unidentified. In 1933, all of the headstones were removed from this cemetery when it was discovered that salts in the soil were causing them to deteriorate. Instead a screen wall was erected with the names of those buried in the cemetery engraved upon it. Plot XXV is a Collective Grave, the individual burial places within this are not known. There are also seven non-war graves in the cemetery.

No. of Identified Casualties: 3703

 

30: SANCTUARY WOOD CEMETERY

Cemetery: SANCTUARY WOOD CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to site possible - maybe by an alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact  the CWGC Enquiries Department on telephone number: 01628 634221

Location Information:

Sanctuary Wood Cemetery is located 5 Km east of Ieper town centre, on the Canadalaan, a road leading from the Meenseweg (N8), connecting Ieper to Menen. From Ieper town centre the Meenseweg is located via Torhoutstraat and right onto Basculestraat. Basculestraat ends at a main cross roads, directly over which begins the Meenseweg. 3 Km along the Meenseweg lies the right hand turning onto Canadalaan. The cemetery itself is located 1.5 Km along Canadalaan on the right hand side of the road. 100 metres beyond the cemetery at the end of the Canadalaan is the Hill 62 Memorial.

Historical Information:

Sanctuary Wood is one of the larger woods in the commune of Zillebeke. It was named in November 1914, when it was used to screen troops behind the front line. It was the scene of fighting in September 1915 and was the centre of the Battle of Mount Sorrel (2-13 June 1916) involving the 1st and 3rd Canadian Divisions. There were three Commonwealth cemeteries at Sanctuary Wood before June 1916, all made in May-August 1915. The first two were on the western end of the wood, the third in a clearing further east. All were practically obliterated in the Battle of Mount Sorrel, but traces of the second were found and it became the nucleus of the present Sanctuary Wood Cemetery. At the Armistice, the cemetery contained 137 graves. From 1927 to 1932, Plots II-V were added and the cemetery extended as far as 'Maple Avenue', when graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. They came mainly from the communes immediately surrounding Ypres, but a few were taken from Nieuport (on the coast) and a few from other cemeteries. Most of these burials were from the 1914 Battles of Ypres and the Allied offensive of the autumn of 1917. There are now 1,989 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 1,353 of the burials are unidentified. Many graves, in all five plots, are identified in groups but not individually. In Plot I is buried Lieutenant G W L Talbot, in whose memory Talbot House at Poperinghe was established in December 1915. The first list of the graves was made by his brother the Reverend N S Talbot, MC, later Bishop of Pretoria. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

No. of Identified Casualties: 637

 

31: PORTSMOUTH (EASTNEY OR HIGHLAND ROAD) CEMETERY

Cemetery: PORTSMOUTH (EASTNEY OR HIGHLAND ROAD) CEMETERY, Hampshire

Historical Information:

Portsmouth, a parliamentary and county borough, is a city, a seaport and a Royal Naval station on Portsea Island, opposite the Isle of Wight. It is 44 kilometres south-east of Southampton and just over 120 kilometres by rail south-west of London. This cemetery, which belongs to the Corporation, is near the barracks. It was opened in 1854 and contains war graves of both world wars. The 1914-1918 burials are spread throughout the cemetery. After the war a Cross of Sacrifice was erected near the entrance, in honour of all the service war dead who rest in the cemetery. The 1939-1945 War graves, too, are widely scattered.

No. of Identified Casualties: 271

 

32: LEICESTER (WELFORD ROAD) CEMETERY

Cemetery: LEICESTER (WELFORD ROAD) CEMETERY, Leicestershire

Historical Information:

During the two world wars, the United Kingdom became an island fortress used for training troops and launching land, sea and air operations around the globe. There are more than 170,000 Commonwealth war graves in the United Kingdom, many being those of servicemen and women killed on active service, or who later succumbed to wounds. Others died in training accidents, or because of sickness or disease. The graves, many of them privately owned and marked by private memorials, will be found in more than 12,000 cemeteries and churchyards. Between 1914 and 1919, the 5th Northern General Hospital, with more than 2,600 beds, occupied several buildings in Leicester and North Evington. More than 95,000 officers and men were admitted to the hospital, which recorded 514 deaths before its closure. During the Second World War, there was a Royal Air Force operational training station near Leicester. Leicester (Welford Road) Cemetery contains 286 First World War burials, more than half of them forming a war graves plot with a screen wall bearing the names of those buried there. The 46 Second World War burials are scattered throughout the cemetery, which also contains seven Belgian war graves.

No. of Identified Casualties: 339

 

33: JERUSALEM MEMORIAL

Cemetery: JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, Israel

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to the cemetery possible, but may be via an alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact the Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200. Location Information: The Jerusalem Memorial stands in Jerusalem War Cemetery, 4.5 kilometres north of the walled city and is situated on the neck of land at the north end of the Mount of Olives, to the west of Mount Scopus. Follow the signs for Mount Scopus. At the crossroads with the Hyatt Hotel, which is on the left, turn left. There is an orange sign which reads "Military Cemetery". Go to the top of the hill, cross almost straight over the junction, then turn right and sharp left. The cemetery will be visible at this point.

Historical Information:

At the outbreak of the First World War, Palestine (now Israel) was part of the Turkish Empire and it was not entered by Allied forces until December 1916. The advance to Jerusalem took a further year, but from 1914 to December 1917, about 250 Commonwealth prisoners of war were buried in the German and Anglo-German cemeteries of the city. By 21 November 1917, the Egyptian Expeditionary Force had gained a line about five kilometres west of Jerusalem, but the city was deliberately spared bombardment and direct attack. Very severe fighting followed, lasting until the evening of 8 December, when the 53rd (Welsh) Division on the south, and the 60th (London) and 74th (Yeomanry) Divisions on the west, had captured all the city's prepared defences. Turkish forces left Jerusalem throughout that night and in the morning of 9 December, the Mayor came to the Allied lines with the Turkish Governor's letter of surrender. Jerusalem was occupied that day and on 11 December, General Allenby formally entered the city, followed by representatives of France and Italy. Meanwhile, the 60th Division pushed across the road to Nablus, and the 53rd across the eastern road. From 26 to 30 December, severe fighting took place to the north and east of the city but it remained in Allied hands. JERUSALEM WAR CEMETERY was begun after the occupation of the city, with 270 burials. It was later enlarged to take graves from the battlefields and smaller cemeteries in the neighbourhood. There are now 2,514 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery, 100 of them unidentified. Within the cemetery stands the JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, commemorating 3,300 Commonwealth servicemen who died during the First World War in operations in Egypt or Palestine and who have no known grave.

No. of Identified Casualties: 3299

 

34:  YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Cemetery: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Visiting Information:

Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels. The design of this site makes access to certain parts of the memorial impossible by wheelchair. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact the CWGC Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Location Information:

Ypres (now Ieper) is a town in the Province of West Flanders. The Memorial is situated at the eastern side of the town on the road to Menin (Menen) and Courtrai (Kortrijk). Each night at 8 pm the traffic is stopped at the Menin Gate while members of the local Fire Brigade sound the Last Post in the roadway under the Memorial's arches.

Historical Information:

The Menin Gate is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations (except New Zealand) who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917. Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL now bears the names of more than 54,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick, was unveiled by Lord Plumer in July 1927.

No. of Identified Casualties: 54338

 

35:    COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERY

Cemetery: COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERY Koksijde, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via the main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact CWGC Enquiries Section on telephone number: 01628 507200

Location Information:

Coxyde Military Cemetery is located approximately 500 metres beyond the village of Koksijde on the N396 towards De Panne. From Koksijde Dorp the N396, Houtsaegerlaan crosses the Zeelaan and at the same time changes its name to Robert Vandammestraat. 1 kilometre along the Robert Vandammestraat N369, on the right hand side, lies the cemetery.

Historical Information:

In June 1917, Commonwealth forces relieved French forces on 6 kilometres of front line from the sea to a point south of Nieuport (now Nieuwpoort), and held this sector for six months. Coxyde (now Koksijde) was about 10 kilometres behind the front line. The village was used for rest billets and was occasionally shelled, but the cemetery, which had been started by French troops, was found to be reasonably safe. It became the most important of the Commonwealth cemeteries on the Belgian coast and was used at night for the burial of the dead brought back from the front line. The French returned to the sector in December 1917 and continued to use the cemetery, and during 1918, Commonwealth naval casualties from bases in Dunkirk (now Dunkerque) were buried there. After the Armistice, graves were brought into the cemetery from isolated sites and from other cemeteries in the area. The cemetery was used again during the Second World War, chiefly for the burial of casualties sustained during the defence of the Dunkirk-Nieuport perimeter in May 1940. The cemetery now contains 1,507 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the French graves from this period having since been removed. Of the 155 Second World War burials, 22 are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

No. of Identified Casualties: 1635

 

36:    ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, MANANCOURT

Cemetery: ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, MANANCOURT, Somme, France

Visiting Information:

The location or design of this site makes wheelchair access impossible. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact CWGC Enquiries Section on 01628 507200.

Location Information:

Rocquigny and Equancourt are two villages in the Department of the Somme, some 13 kilometres north of Peronne and 12 kilometres south-east of Bapaume. Rocquigny and Equancourt are approximately 8 kilometres apart and the Rocquigny-Equancourt British Cemetery lies about halfway between the two villages on the north side of the road just west of the crossing road from Etricourt to Ytres.

Historical Information:

Etricourt was occupied by Commonwealth troops at the beginning of April 1917 during the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. It was lost on the 23 March 1918 when the Germans advanced, but regained at the beginning of September. The cemetery was begun in 1917 and used until March 1918, mainly by the 21st and 48th Casualty Clearing Stations posted at Ytres, and to a small extent by the Germans, who knew it as "Etricourt Old English Cemetery". Burials were resumed by Commonwealth troops in September 1918 and the 3rd Canadian and 18th Casualty Clearing Stations buried in it in October and November 1918. The cemetery contains 1,838 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 21 of the burials are unidentified and nine Commonwealth graves made by the Germans which cannot now be found are represented by special memorials. The cemetery also contains 198 German war burials and the graves of ten French civilians. The cemetery was desiged by Sir Reginald Blomfield

No. of Identified Casualties: 2022

 

37:    PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL

Cemetery:
PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut Belgium

Visiting Information:

The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels.

Location Information:

The Ploegsteert Memorial stands in Berks Cemetery Extension, which is located 12.5 kilometres south of Ieper town centre, on the N365 leading from Ieper to Mesen (Messines), Ploegsteert and on to Armentieres. From Ieper town centre the Rijselsestraat runs from the market square, through the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) and directly over the crossroads with the Ieper ring road. The road name then changes to the Rijselseweg (N336). 3.5 kilometres along the N336 lies a fork junction with the N365. The N365, which forms the right hand fork, leads to the town of Mesen. The Cemetery lies 3 kilometres beyond Mesen on the right hand side of the N365, and opposite Hyde Park Corner Royal Berks Cemetery. The sounding of the Last Post takes place at the Ploegsteert Memorial on the first Friday of every month at 7 p.m.

Historical Information:

The PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL commemorates more than 11,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in this sector during the First World War and have no known grave. The memorial serves the area from the line Caestre-Dranoutre-Warneton to the north, to Haverskerque-Estaires-Fournes to the south, including the towns of Hazebrouck, Merville, Bailleul and Armentieres, the Forest of Nieppe, and Ploegsteert Wood. The original intention had been to erect the memorial in Lille. Those commemorated by the memorial did not die in major offensives, such as those which took place around Ypres to the north, or Loos to the south. Most were killed in the course of the day-to-day trench warfare which characterised this part of the line, or in small scale set engagements, usually carried out in support of the major attacks taking place elsewhere. BERKS CEMETERY EXTENSION, in which the memorial stands, was begun in June 1916 and used continuously until September 1917. At the Armistice, the extension comprised Plot I only, but Plots II and III were added in 1930 when graves were brought in from Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery and Extension, about 1 kilometre to the north-west, when it was established that these sites could not be acquired in perpetuity. Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery was used by fighting units from November 1914 to August 1916. The extension was begun in May 1916 and used until March 1918. Together, the Rosenberg Chateau cemetery and extension were sometimes referred to as 'Red Lodge'. Berks Cemetery Extension now contains 876 First World War burials. HYDE PARK CORNER (ROYAL BERKS) CEMETERY is separated from Berks Cemetery Extension by a road. It was begun in April 1915 by the 1st/4th Royal Berkshire Regiment and was used at intervals until November 1917. Hyde Park Corner was a road junction to the north of Ploegsteert Wood. Hill 63 was to the north-west and nearby were the 'Catacombs', deep shelters capable of holding two battalions, which were used from November 1916 onwards. The cemetery contains 83 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and four German war graves The cemetery, cemetery extension and memorial were designed by H Chalton Bradshaw, with sculpture by Gilbert Ledward.

No. of Identified Casualties: 11370

 

38:    BUCQUOY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

Cemetery: BUCQUOY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION Pas de Calais France

Visiting Information:

Wheelchair access to this site with some difficulty. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact CWGC Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Location Information:

Bucquoy is a village in the Pas de Calais approximately 16 kilometres south of Arras. Take the Arras to Bucquoy road (D919). On entering the village, turn left at the first main crossroads. Following the CWGC signpost, drive by the church and then turn left. A second CWGC signpost will be seen on the wall of a house. Continue straight on until you come to the communal cemetery, which backs onto pastureland. The Extension is on the left hand side of the communal cemetery, separated from it by a path, but access is through the communal cemetery.

Historical Information:

The village of Bucquoy was occupied by the 7th Division on 17 March 1917, and was the scene of very heavy fighting in March and April 1918. Bucquoy Communal Cemetery Extension was made by the Royal Naval Division burial officer at the beginning of September 1918. It contains 68 First World War burials, all dating from 23-28 August 1918. The extension was designed by W H Cowlishaw.

No. of Identified Casualties: 66

 

39:    SAILLY-LABOURSE COMMUNAL CEMETERY

Cemetery: SAILLY-LABOURSE COMMUNAL CEMETERY Pas de Calais France

Location Information:

Sailly-Labourse is a village five kilometres south-east of Bethune on the main road to Lens (N43). A CWGC signpost can be seen on this road.

Historical Information:

The village of Sailly-Labourse was used for rest billets and by field ambulances for much of the First World War. It was close to the battlefield of Loos, but from October 1915 to September 1918, no considerable advance or retirement took place in this sector. SAILLY-LABOURSE COMMUNAL CEMETERY contains 126 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. Rows B to G and parts of H, J, O, P, Q and R contain French graves of 1914-15, and Rows H to R contain Commonwealth graves from August 1915 to April 1917. One Second World War airman is also buried in the cemetery. The adjoining EXTENSION, begun by the 2/8th Manchesters in May 1917 and used until October 1918, contains 215 Commonwealth and two German burials.

No. of Identified Casualties: 127

 

40:    ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN

Cemetery:  ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN Seine-Maritime France

Visiting Information:

OPENING TIMES: 1 March - 1 November: Monday-Saturday : 0815 - 1745 Sundays/Public Holidays : 0815 - 1745 2 November - 28 February: Every Day: 0815 - 1645

Location Information:

St Sever Cemetery and St. Sever Cemetery Extension are located within a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs of Le Grand Quevilly and Le Petit Quevilly. If approaching Rouen from the north, head for the centre of town and cross over the river Seine, following signs for Caen. Follow this route until you get to the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), then take the first exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If approaching Rouen from the south, follow the N138 (Avenue des Canadiens) towards the centre of town. At the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), take the fourth exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If arriving on foot, take the metro to St Sever Metro Station, then follow the Avenue de Caen until you get to the Avenue de la Liberation, then take this road and follow this, which will become the Boulevard du 11 Novembre. At the end of this road is the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout. Take the first exit from this into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left.

Historical Information:

During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. A base supply depot and the 3rd Echelon of General Headquarters were also established in the city. Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920. During the Second World War, Rouen was again a hospital centre and the extension was used once more for the burial of Commonwealth servicemen, many of whom died as prisoners of war during the German occupation. The cemetery extension contains 8,346 Commonwealth burials of the First World War (ten of them unidentified) and 328 from the Second World War (18 of them unidentified). There are also 8 Foreign National burials here. The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

No. of Identified Casualties: 8656

 

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